Stuart Mill English

How to Learn, How to Teach English

Talking about Technology

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Technology

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to technology

Materials: Six devices (for example, iPod, cell phone, remote control, camera, laptop, toaster, GPS, etc. They can be anything.) A computer with an internet connection would also help for the last activity.

Grammar: Imperatives, present simple questions

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

How’s that work? Say this when you want to understand how something happens.
What’s that do? Say this when you want to understand what something does.
First, you should… Say this to explain how to start doing something.
Next, you should… Say these to explain the middle steps of a process.
Now, you have to…
Then, you…
Finally, you… Say this to explain how to finish a process.
First, you should get some bread. Say these to explain how to make toast
Next, you should put the bread in the toaster.
Now, you have to wait a minute or two.
Then, you take the toast out of the toaster.
Finally, you put butter on the toast and enjoy!

Vocabulary: device, first, next, now, then, finally

Vocabulary Practice Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Your Devices Look at your six devices. Answer the following questions about each device:

  • Why do people like it?
  • Is it popular?
  • Could you live without it?
  • How often do you use it?
  • Do your parents use it too?

Describe how to use things Think of three devices. Write directions for how to use them (follow the toaster example). Share your directions with your partner

Answer Questions Discuss the following technology questions

Is technology important to you?

What are the most important technologies in the world?

Do you like learning how to use new things?

Do your parents like learning how to use new things?

Are people who play video games better with new technology? Why?

Are you good at explaining how to use technological devices?

Your Questions Now write five technology questions of your own. Discuss them with your partner

Web/Field Trip Go to a website or a store with lots of technological devices. Find ten things you want to buy and explain why you want to buy them

November 9, 2010 Posted by | Speaking, Studying Strategies | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Talking about Future Travel

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Future Travel

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss future travel.

Materials: A computer with an internet connection; Pictures of these things (from a magazine or on the internet): A fork, a car, a toilet, a skirt, a tree, a soccer ball, and a cigarette

Grammar: Future Modals

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’d love to go there. Say these about places that you want to visit
I think that’s the most beautiful place in the world.
It looks like paradise.
I think it’d be better to avoid that place. Say these about places that you don’t want to visit.
I heard bad things about it.
It’s not high on my list of places to go.
I’d love to live there. Say these about places that you want to live.
I could make a home there.

Vocabulary: Paradise, Island, Museum, To go skiing, To go hiking, To go swimming, beach, site seeing

Google the Vocab Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Controlled Activity Search YouTube for these countries and the word “travel”: Thailand, North Korea, France, Russia, Columbia, Canada.  Watch a video. Answer these questions:

What do you see?

Would you like to visit this country? Why/Why not?

Question Time Ask your partner these questions.

If you had $100,000,000, which countries would you visit?

Which countries would you like to live in?

Could you live in a country where you don’t speak the language?

Which languages would you like to learn?

What things do you like to do on vacation?

Would you prefer to visit museums or sit on a beach?

Would you prefer to sit on a beach or go skiing?

Would you prefer to go skiing or go shopping?

Do you like camping?

Your Questions Now write five discussion questions and ask your partner.

Same or different? Write the names of five countries. Then look at pictures of these things and answer the questions below

A fork: Do people eat the same in your five countries? Do they use forks? How do they eat?

A car: Do people drive a lot in your five countries? How do people normally travel inside a city? How do they travel between cities?

A toilet: Do most people use a toilet in your five countries? Are toilets necessary?

A skirt: How do people dress in your five countries? Are short skirts OK? Why/why not?

A tree: Describe the nature in your five countries. Are there mountains? Oceans? Beaches? Where do you think people go on vacation?

A soccer ball: What are the most popular sports in your five countries? Do you like those sports?

A cigarette: Do a lot of people smoke in your five countries? Is it OK to smoke in bars and restaurants?

Watch a Movie Find a movie about travel and watch it with your partner. Here are some good choices.

National Lampoons European Vacation (Comedy)

Earth (Documentary)

Elizabethtown (Romantic Comedy)

August 14, 2010 Posted by | Speaking, Studying Strategies | , , | Leave a comment

Talking about Sports

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Sports

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss sports.

Materials: A computer with an internet connection

Grammar: Present Simple, Verbs + Gerunds and Verbs + Infinitives

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’m really competitive. Say these if winning is really important to you.
I play to win.
I can’t stand losing.
I just like to have a good time. Say these if winning isn’t really important to you.
I don’t like to take games too seriously.
It’s just a game!
It was over before it began. Say these when a team is easily winning.
They’re dominating.
They’re getting their butts kicked. Say this about a team that is losing badly.
Don’t give up! Say this to someone who should keep trying.
What an exciting match! Say this when you are enjoying watching a match.

Vocabulary: team, competitive, match, dominate, to give up

Vocabulary Practice Go to Sport Illustrated’s website and look at the pictures. Find a picture of something that shows a team; something that shows competition, something that shows match; something that shows dominate; and something that shows to give up

Discussion Questions Discuss these questions about sports with your partner.

Do you like to watch sports? Why? What do you like to watch?

Do you like to play sports? Why? What do you like to play?

Is winning very important to you? Why/Why not?

Do you like to play other games (like chess)? Which games do you like to play OR Why don’t you like to play games?

Is it important for children to play sports? Why/Why not?

Which sport is better for children: soccer or baseball?

Strange Sports Do a Google image search for these sports. Describe them to your partner. Would you like to try playing them?

  • Curling
  • Midget Throwing
  • Bog Snorkeling
  • Underwater Rugby
  • Sumo Wrestling
  • Lawn Mower Racing

Your Questions Write five discussion questions about sports. Ask your partner your questions.

Next Why not ask your classmates to play a sport together. You could make one of the rules that you have to speak English. Anyone who doesn’t speak English gets a penalty.

July 31, 2010 Posted by | Speaking, Studying Strategies | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Talking about Money

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Money

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss money.

Materials: none

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I mostly spend money on food. Say this to describe how you spend your money. We chose “food” but you can say any noun.
I need to get some cash. Say when you need to find an ATM/Cashpoint/Bank Machine.
I found a great deal. Say after you found something for a cheap price.
I’m broke. Say when you don’t have money.
I’m dead broke. Say when you really, really don’t have money.
That’s way too expensive. Say after you see something with a very high price.
That’s a great deal. Say after you see something with a very low price.
I need to save up some money for that. Say when you want to buy something after you have more money.
I went on a bit of a spending spree. Say when you spent a lot of money on different things.

Vocabulary: cash, broke, dead broke, deal, spending spree

Vocab Activity: Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Makes lists Write a list of ten things you have bought recently.

Ask your partner the following questions about each item (example answers are in italics):

What is the first thing on your list? The first thing I bought was soap.

Why did you buy it? We didn’t have any more soap at home.

Was it a good deal? Yes. It was a great deal! I only paid fifty cents. / No, it was way too expensive.

Are you glad you bought it? Yes!

Why/Why not? I like being clean!

Question Time: Now ask your partner these questions:

What do you usually spend money on?

Do you usually find good deals?

What is the most expensive thing you ever bought?

What are three expensive things you want to buy in the next five years?

Do you like spending money? How do you feel when you buy things?

Do people save a lot of money in your country? Do people spend too much money in your country?

Do your parents and you feel the same about money? How are different generations different?

Your Questions: Write five discussion questions about money. Ask your partner your questions.

YouTube Money Videos Search YouTube for the following songs and discuss which one you like the most and why.

“Money for Nothing” by The Dire Straights

“Money” by The Beatles

“Money” by Pink Floyd

July 17, 2010 Posted by | Speaking, Studying Strategies | , , , | 1 Comment

Talking about Movies

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Movies

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss movies

Materials: Paper and Pens

Grammar: Present Simple, Present Perfect, Stative Verbs

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I really like action movies. Say one of these after someone asks you: “What kind of movies do you like?”
I really like comedies.
I really like horror movies.
I really like dramas.
I really like romantic comedies.
That sounds interesting. Say these after someone suggests going to see a good movie.
Oh, yeah. I’d love to see that.
Oh, I heard that was good. Let’s go!
Mmmm. I don’t know. Say these after someone suggests going to see a bad movie.
I don’t think that’s the movie for me.
That’s not really my favorite kind of movie.
How about something else?
It looks exciting. Say this about an action movie that you want to see.
It looks funny. Say this about a comedy that you want to see.
It looks scary. Say this about a horror movie that you want to see.
It looks interesting. Say this about a drama that you want to see.
It looks sweet. Say this about a romantic comedy that you want to see.

Vocabulary: genre, action movie, comedy, horror movie, drama, romantic comedy, anime, documentaries, sci-fi

Draw Movie Posters. On three pieces of paper you should draw three movie posters. Each poster should be for a different genre.

Guess Movie Genres. Now, look at your partner’s pieces of paper and guess what genres they drew. How do you know? Say at least three things that represent the genre. (For example: “That’s a romantic comedy. I know because the guy and girl are kissing. Also, they’re falling off of a boat, which is funny. And it looks sweet.”)

Ask your partner if he/she likes each genre and why/why not?

Do you like action movies? Why/Why not?

Do you like comedies? Why/Why not?

Do you like horror movies? Why/Why not?

Do you like dramas? Why/Why not?

Do you like romantic comedies? Why/Why not?

Discuss movie questions

What movies are in the theater now? (It means: What movies can you watch in a theater now?)

Which movies do you want to see now? Why?

What are some movies you’ve seen recently? Did you like them? Why/why not?

What are some of your favorite movies? Why did you like them?

What is your favorite kind of movie? (Action, drama, etc.) Why?

Do you like to eat popcorn at the movies?

Do you prefer to go to a movie theater or stay at home?

Your movie questions Write five movie discussion questions. Ask your partner the questions.

Watch a movie Now, discuss which movie you’d like to watch and watch it with your partner. Then discuss it. Don’t forget the popcorn.

July 10, 2010 Posted by | Speaking, Studying Strategies | , , , | Leave a comment

How to listen to this song: “Chinese Translation” by M. Ward

Student Self Study: How to listen to this song

Song: “Chinese Translation” by M. Ward

The goal of listening to this song is to improve word stress. Stress means how strongly you say the word. Word stress is usually really hard for East Asian students. Unfortunately, native speakers have a lot of trouble understanding people who stress words in strange ways.

“Chinese Translation” is a nice song for practicing word stress. Enjoy.

Do these things…

Listen to the song: You can listen to it here, or search the internet. Listen to the song first. Don’t read the lyrics the first time. Listen first, then you can read the lyrics next.

Read the lyrics (and listen again):

I sailed a wild, wild sea,
climbed up a tall, tall mountain.
I met an old, old man
beneath a weeping willow tree.
He said now if you got some questions,
go and lay them at my feet,
but my time here is brief,
so you’ll have to pick just three.

And I said…

What do you do with the pieces of a broken heart?
And how can a man like me remain in the light?
And if life is really as short as they say,

then why is the night so long?
And then the sun went down,

and he sang for me this song.

See I once was a young fool like you,
afraid to do the things,

that I knew I had to do.
So I played an escapade just like you.
I played an escapade just like you.

I sailed a wild, wild sea,
climbed up a tall, tall mountain.
I met an old, old man,
he sat beneath a sapling tree.
He said now if you got some questions,
go and lay them at my feet,
but my time here is brief,
so you’ll have to pick just three.

And I said…
What do you do with the pieces of a broken heart?
And how can a man like me remain in the light?
And if life is really as short as they say,

then why is the night so long?
And then the sun went down,
and he played for me this song.

If you want, you can look up new words here: http://www.ldoceonline.com)

Note word stress: Listen again. Don’t look at the lyrics. Fill in the sheet below. Put an X in places where the word is stressed. Listen as many times as you need to. We did the first sentence for you, but there is no perfect answer. You can disagree. Listening and trying will help your word stress skills a lot.

_ __X____ _ __X__, __X__ ___,

_______ __ _ ____, ____ ________.

_ ___ __ ___, ___ ___

_______ _ _______ ______ ____.

__ ____ ___ __ ___ ___ ____ _________,

__ ___ ___ ____ __ __ ____,

___ __ ____ ____ __ _____,

__ ______ ____ __ ____ ____ _____.

___ _ ____…

____ __ ___ __ ____ ___ ______ __ _ ______ _____?

___ ___ ___ _ ___ ____ __ ______ __ ___ _____?

___ __ ____ __ ______ __ _____ __ ____ ___,

____ ___ __ ___ _____ __ ____?

___ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____,

___ __ ____ ___ __ ____ ____.
___ _ ____ ___ _ _____ ____ ____ ___,

______ __ __ ___ ______,

____ _ ____ _ ___ __ __.

__ _ ______ __ ________ ____ ____ ___.

_ ______ __ ________ ____ ____ ___.

_ ______ _ ____, ____ ___,

_______ __ _ ____, ____ ________.

_ ___ __ ___, ___ ___

__ ___ _______ _ _______ ____.

__ ____ ___ __ ___ ___ ____ _________,

__ ___ ___ ____ __ __ ____,

___ __ ____ ____ __ _____,

__ ______ ____ __ ____ ____ _____.

___ _ ____…
____ __ ___ __ ____ ___ ______ __ _ ______ _____?

___ ___ ___ _ ___ ____ __ ______ __ ___ _____?

___ __ ____ __ ______ __ _____ __ ____ ___,

____ ___ __ ___ _____ __ ____?

___ ____ ___ ___ ____ ____,

___ __ ______ ___ __ ____ ____.

Sing along: Finally, using the two sheets, sing along with the song. Go back to the lyrics and circle the words that are stressed. (Circle the words that got an X.) Then, sing the song.

July 6, 2010 Posted by | How to listen to this..., Listening, Speaking | , , , , , | 3 Comments

Talking about Past Travel

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember to only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Past Travel

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss previous travel

Materials: A map of the world or a globe

Grammar: Past Simple, Present Perfect

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’ve seen some amazing things. Say this to explain that you have been to many places with great things.
I’ve flown a lot. Say this to say that plane travel is normal for you.
I went there once. Say this about a place that you visited.
I couldn’t stand that place. Say this when you really didn’t like a place.
The people were really nice. Say this to describe good people.
The thing that surprised me was the weather. Say this about something (for example the weather) that was surprising.
I’d rather fly. Say this if flying is better for you.
I think I’d prefer to drive. Say this if driving is better for you.

Vocabulary: trip, vacation (holiday), terminal, baggage, airport security, visa, plane, car, train, to check a bag, carry-on

Guess the words: Look up the vocabulary words in a dictionary. Then choose a word. Explain the word until your partner guesses the word. Then, your partner should explain a word and you should guess it.

For example:

A: This is something that flies. You get on it at an airport…

B: Plane!

A: Right. Now, it’s your turn.

B: This is something you drive. Lots of people own one. It’s a form of transportation.

A: Car!

B: That’s right.

Take a look at the map Take a look at your map or globe. Point to the places that you have been to. Quickly, tell your partner about those places.

Now, choose a place at random (“to choose at random” means to choose without thinking about it. For example, spin the globe, close your eyes, and stop it by putting your finger on the globe.)

Ask your partner: Would you like to live there? Why/Why not? What would be good about living there? What would be bad about living there?

For example:

A: Mexico!

B: Would you like to live there?

A: Yes, I would. / No, I wouldn’t.

B: Why? / Why not?

A: Because, I think it has nice weather. / Because, I think it’s too hot.

B: What would be good about living there.

A: Hmm, I think the people are probably nice.

B: What would be bad about living there.

A: I don’t speak Spanish, so that would be hard for me!

Then, repeat. Choose ten places.

Question Time Now, ask your partner these questions.

Do you like driving?

Do you like flying?

Do you prefer to drive or fly? (What’s better: flying or driving?) Why?

Describe a great vacation you have had.

How many times have you flown on a plane?

Name all the places you have been.

What are some of the best things you have seen when traveling?

What was your worst travel experience?

Do you prefer to travel alone or with other people?

Your Questions Now, write five discussion questions about Travel. Ask your partner your questions.

Write a Letter With your partner, choose a place that you really want to visit. Find a travel agency and write them a letter/email or visit them. Ask them to give you information about the place that you chose.

For Chicago, you can find more information here.

And a song: Do a search of YouTube for “Impossible Germany” by Wilco for a nice song that’s kind of related to travel.

June 23, 2010 Posted by | Speaking | , , , | Leave a comment

How to listen to this song: “Young Folks” by Peter, Bjorn, and John

Student Self Study: How to listen to this song

Song: “Young Folks” by Peter, Bjorn and John

The goal of listening to this song is to improve word stress. Stress means how strongly you say the word. Word stress is usually really hard for East Asian students. Unfortunately, native speakers have a lot of trouble understanding people who stress words in strange ways.

“Young Folks” is a nice song for practicing word stress. It’s about a boy who likes a girl. He’s worried that she won’t like him because of his past, but she doesn’t care about his past. They both only care about talking with each other. Enjoy.

Do these things…

Listen to the song: You can listen to it here, or search the internet. Listen to the song first. Don’t read the lyrics the first time. Listen first, then you can read the lyrics next.

Read the lyrics: Listen again. This time, read the lyrics.

A: If I told you things I did before, told you how I used to be, would you go along with someone like me? If you knew my story word for word, had all of my history, would you go along with someone like me?

B: I lived before and had my share, it didn’t lead nowhere. I would go along with someone like you. It doesn’t matter what you do, who you are hanging with, we could stick around and see this night through.

A and B: And we don’t care about the young folks (talkin’ about the young style).

A and B: And we don’t care about the old folks (talkin’ ‘bout the old style too).

A and B: And we don’t care about our own folks (talkin’ bout our own stuff).

A and B: All we care about is talking, talking only me and you.

B: Usually when things has gone this far, people tend to disappear. No one will surprise me unless you do.

A: I can tell there’s something going on, hours seems to disappear. Everyone is leaving I’m still with you.

A and B: It doesn’t matter what we do, where we are going to, we can stick around and see this night through.

Note word stress: Listen again. Don’t look at the lyrics. Fill in the sheet below. Put an X in places where the word is stressed. Listen as many times as you need to. We did the first sentence for you, but there is no perfect answer. You can disagree. It’s important for you to listen and try. It’s not important for each student to put Xs in the same places.

A: _X_ _ ____ ___ ___X___ X _X_ ___X___, __X__ ___ ___ _ __X__ _X_ _X_ , __X___ ___ __ _____ ____ ____X___ __X__ _X_? __ ___ ____ __ _____ ____ ___ ____, ___ ___ __ __ _______, _____ ___ __ _____ ____ _______ ____ __?

B: _ _____ ______ ___ ___ __ _____, ______ ____ _______. _ _____ __ _____ ____ _______ ____ ___. __ _______ ______ ____ ___ __, ___ ___ _______ ____, __ _____ _____ ______ ___ ___ ____ _____ _______

A and B: ___ __ ____ ____ _____ ___ _____ _____ (______ _____ ___ _____ ____).

A and B: ___ __ ____ ____ _____ ___ ___ _____ (______ _____ ___ ___ _____ ___).

A and B: ___ __ ____ ____ _____ ___ ___ _____ (______ _____ ___ ___ _____).

A and B: ___ __ ____ _____ __ _______, _______ ____ __ ___ ___.

B: _______ ____ ______ ___ ____ ____ ___, ______ ____ __ _________. __ ___ ____ _______ __ ______ ___ __.

A: _ ___ ____ _______ _________ _____ __, _____ _____ __ _________. ________ __ _______ ___ _____ ____ ___.

A and B: __ _______ ______ ____ __ __, _____ __ ___ _____ __, __ ___ _____ ______ ___ ___ ____ _____ _______.

Sing along: Finally, using the two sheets, sing along with the song. Go back to the lyrics and circle the words that are stressed. (Circle the words that got an X.) Then, sing the song.

June 21, 2010 Posted by | How to listen to this..., Listening, Speaking | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Talking about Personality

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons or give them as homework.

Topic: Personality

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss personality.

Materials: None

Grammar: Adjectives

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

She’s really interesting. Say these to describe a personality.
He’s a funny guy. He makes me laugh.
I like her, but she is a little boring. I wish she was more interesting.
He’s the smartest person I know. I think he should be a professor.
She’s really well-mannered. My parents like her a lot.
She’s so talkative. It’s a good thing I like listening!
I’m shy, so it takes a long time to get to know me.
When I don’t sleep enough, I’m really grouchy.

Vocabulary: trait, interesting, funny, boring, smart, well-mannered, talkative, shy, grouchy

Vocabulary Practice: Draw pictures of these words: Interesting, funny, boring, smart, well-mannered, talkative, shy, grouchy

Some More vocabulary: Go to this website and find five words that seem interesting. Look them up in a dictionary and draw pictures of them.

Go outside! Go to a public place like a mall or a busy street. Look at the different people. Make guesses about their personalities. Ask your partner why they think so. For example…

A: She might be interesting to talk to.

B: Why do you think so?

A: Look at her hair. Anyone with that haircut must be interesting.

B: He seems nice.

A: Why do you think so?

B: Well, he let that lady go first in the line. It was nice.

Question Time Discuss these questions:

Describe your personality. What kind of person are you?

Describe your partner’s personality. What kind of person is he/she?

Describe your parents’ personalities. What kind of people are they?

Do you prefer outgoing or shy people? Why?

Do you prefer slow or fast people? (People who do things slowly or people who do things fast) Why?

Is there a person who changed your personality? Who? How?

Think of three jobs. What kind of personality should people with those jobs have? (Example: A fireman should be brave.)

Your Questions Now write five personality questions and ask your partner your questions.

Paintings Look at three paintings. You can go to a museum or look at paintings here. Discuss these questions.

What kind of person painted this? Describe his/her personality? Why do you think that?

June 17, 2010 Posted by | Speaking | , , | Leave a comment

Talking about Food

This is a speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember to only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons or give them as homework.

Topic: Food

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss food

Materials: Pictures of food (for example, a food magazine or a computer with internet so you can find them)

Grammar: Present Simple

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

Mmmmm! Say this after something tastes good
Would you like to try it? Say this to offer your food to another person
What looks good? Say this to learn what your friend likes on the menu
It’s delicious. Say these after you try good food
It tastes great.
It’s too salty for my taste. Say this after you eat food with too much salt.
It’s too sweet for my taste. Say this after you eat food with too much sugar.
It’s too spicy for my taste. Say this after you east really hot food.
I’d love to try that. Say this after you see good food.
Yuck. Say this after you eat/see bad food.
I couldn’t eat another bite. Say this when you can’t eat more food.
It tastes like heaven. Say this after you eat really good food.

Vocabulary: full, hungry, delicious, salty, sweet, spicy, bite, yuck, dish

Vocab Activity: Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Controlled Activity Think of a great meal you ate in the past. Write answers to these questions (example answers are in italics):

What did you eat? I ate chicken, beans, and potatoes.

Where did you eat? I ate at a restaurant in Chicago.

Why was it great? The food was really great. The chicken was juicy and the vegetables were very tasty. I think the best part was the sauce. I don’t know what it was, but the potatoes tasted great with it.

Question Time Now, open up a magazine with lots of pictures of food, or go to a website with lots of pictures of food (examples: www.bbc.co.uk/food, www.foodnetwork.com)

Look at the pictures of food or look around the website, and ask your partner these questions:

What looks good?

What would you like to try?

Do you like cooking?

Do you think that’s delicious?

What food makes you say “yuck!”

What is your favorite food?

Do you like to try new foods?

What kinds of food does your mom make?

Do you like to cook? Why/Why not?

Your Questions Now write five questions about food. Ask your partner your questions.

Shopping Trip Now go to a grocery store. Speak English the whole time. Choose some ingredients and make dinner together.

June 12, 2010 Posted by | Speaking | , , , , | Leave a comment