Stuart Mill English

How to Learn, How to Teach English

Hands over Mouths

This is part of a series of lesson plans on word stress, timing, and intonation. Click here to read a short introduction.

Name: Hands over mouths

Prep Time: None (Enough time to print the worksheets)

Materials: Worksheets (Click to download or see below)

Primary Objective: Practice Word Stress

Other Benefits: Discuss Travel

Plan:

15 Minutes

Give the students the worksheets. First they should write their own endings to the sentences. Then they should match the given endings. Just walk around and check them as they’re writing.

15 Minutes

Now, read the sentences out loud for the students. They should listen and repeat. Pay careful attention to make sure that they are stressing the correct words. If you’d prefer, you can play this track for them instead.

5 Minutes

Now, students should look at their sheets and underline the stressed words.

5 Minutes

Next, read the sentences out loud and have the students repeat them again.

10 Minutes

Walk around and give specialized help as the students practice reading in pairs.

5 Minutes

Now, choose a random sentence and read it with your hands over your mouth. The students should guess which sentence you read. Do another. Ask them how they were able to guess if they couldn’t understand any sounds?

5 Minutes

Now the students should again practice reading the sentences in pairs, but this time with their hands over their mouths. Partners should guess which sentence they were reading.

Extension

After reading each sentence again, students should ask each other: Do you agree or disagree? Why?

Ideas for Homework: Write 10 travel sentences and underline the stressed words.

In case you have trouble downloading the handout, here are the sentences for this activity. Of course you can also write different sentences that better suit your class.

I like to travel alone, but sometimes I travel with other people.

If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you travel to?

When I fly, I prefer to have a window seat.

I spent too much time on the beach and got sunburned.

I’d much rather walk around a museum, than sit on a cruise ship.

There’s no way one suitcase would ever hold everything I want to bring.

The last place on earth I’d want to go is Alaska. It’s too cold!

I never forget to bring my towel when I travel; it’s the most important thing for me.

I just love tasting all the new foods when I’m at restaurants in new cities.

My advice is to travel in the fall; it’s not too cold, but it’s also not too busy.

September 29, 2010 Posted by | Lesson Plans, Word Stress, Timing, and Intonation (Prosody) Lesson Plans | , , , | 1 Comment

Talking about Future Travel

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Future Travel

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss future travel.

Materials: A computer with an internet connection; Pictures of these things (from a magazine or on the internet): A fork, a car, a toilet, a skirt, a tree, a soccer ball, and a cigarette

Grammar: Future Modals

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’d love to go there. Say these about places that you want to visit
I think that’s the most beautiful place in the world.
It looks like paradise.
I think it’d be better to avoid that place. Say these about places that you don’t want to visit.
I heard bad things about it.
It’s not high on my list of places to go.
I’d love to live there. Say these about places that you want to live.
I could make a home there.

Vocabulary: Paradise, Island, Museum, To go skiing, To go hiking, To go swimming, beach, site seeing

Google the Vocab Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Controlled Activity Search YouTube for these countries and the word “travel”: Thailand, North Korea, France, Russia, Columbia, Canada.  Watch a video. Answer these questions:

What do you see?

Would you like to visit this country? Why/Why not?

Question Time Ask your partner these questions.

If you had $100,000,000, which countries would you visit?

Which countries would you like to live in?

Could you live in a country where you don’t speak the language?

Which languages would you like to learn?

What things do you like to do on vacation?

Would you prefer to visit museums or sit on a beach?

Would you prefer to sit on a beach or go skiing?

Would you prefer to go skiing or go shopping?

Do you like camping?

Your Questions Now write five discussion questions and ask your partner.

Same or different? Write the names of five countries. Then look at pictures of these things and answer the questions below

A fork: Do people eat the same in your five countries? Do they use forks? How do they eat?

A car: Do people drive a lot in your five countries? How do people normally travel inside a city? How do they travel between cities?

A toilet: Do most people use a toilet in your five countries? Are toilets necessary?

A skirt: How do people dress in your five countries? Are short skirts OK? Why/why not?

A tree: Describe the nature in your five countries. Are there mountains? Oceans? Beaches? Where do you think people go on vacation?

A soccer ball: What are the most popular sports in your five countries? Do you like those sports?

A cigarette: Do a lot of people smoke in your five countries? Is it OK to smoke in bars and restaurants?

Watch a Movie Find a movie about travel and watch it with your partner. Here are some good choices.

National Lampoons European Vacation (Comedy)

Earth (Documentary)

Elizabethtown (Romantic Comedy)

August 14, 2010 Posted by | Speaking, Studying Strategies | , , | Leave a comment

Talking about Past Travel

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember to only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Past Travel

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss previous travel

Materials: A map of the world or a globe

Grammar: Past Simple, Present Perfect

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’ve seen some amazing things. Say this to explain that you have been to many places with great things.
I’ve flown a lot. Say this to say that plane travel is normal for you.
I went there once. Say this about a place that you visited.
I couldn’t stand that place. Say this when you really didn’t like a place.
The people were really nice. Say this to describe good people.
The thing that surprised me was the weather. Say this about something (for example the weather) that was surprising.
I’d rather fly. Say this if flying is better for you.
I think I’d prefer to drive. Say this if driving is better for you.

Vocabulary: trip, vacation (holiday), terminal, baggage, airport security, visa, plane, car, train, to check a bag, carry-on

Guess the words: Look up the vocabulary words in a dictionary. Then choose a word. Explain the word until your partner guesses the word. Then, your partner should explain a word and you should guess it.

For example:

A: This is something that flies. You get on it at an airport…

B: Plane!

A: Right. Now, it’s your turn.

B: This is something you drive. Lots of people own one. It’s a form of transportation.

A: Car!

B: That’s right.

Take a look at the map Take a look at your map or globe. Point to the places that you have been to. Quickly, tell your partner about those places.

Now, choose a place at random (“to choose at random” means to choose without thinking about it. For example, spin the globe, close your eyes, and stop it by putting your finger on the globe.)

Ask your partner: Would you like to live there? Why/Why not? What would be good about living there? What would be bad about living there?

For example:

A: Mexico!

B: Would you like to live there?

A: Yes, I would. / No, I wouldn’t.

B: Why? / Why not?

A: Because, I think it has nice weather. / Because, I think it’s too hot.

B: What would be good about living there.

A: Hmm, I think the people are probably nice.

B: What would be bad about living there.

A: I don’t speak Spanish, so that would be hard for me!

Then, repeat. Choose ten places.

Question Time Now, ask your partner these questions.

Do you like driving?

Do you like flying?

Do you prefer to drive or fly? (What’s better: flying or driving?) Why?

Describe a great vacation you have had.

How many times have you flown on a plane?

Name all the places you have been.

What are some of the best things you have seen when traveling?

What was your worst travel experience?

Do you prefer to travel alone or with other people?

Your Questions Now, write five discussion questions about Travel. Ask your partner your questions.

Write a Letter With your partner, choose a place that you really want to visit. Find a travel agency and write them a letter/email or visit them. Ask them to give you information about the place that you chose.

For Chicago, you can find more information here.

And a song: Do a search of YouTube for “Impossible Germany” by Wilco for a nice song that’s kind of related to travel.

June 23, 2010 Posted by | Speaking | , , , | Leave a comment